Monday, 27 November 2017

Red Stone Forest National Geological Park (红石林国家地质公园), Hunan, China

This is our 2nd day of Wing On Hunan trip.

Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


As we were heading for Zhangjiajie (張家界) from Fenghuang Old Town (凤凰古城) that i visited yesterday, located almost exactly half way between these 2 places is the Red Stone Forest National Geological Park. We stopped here for a brief visit.

Sign, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


According to geologists, this red stone forest was formed about 450 ± 3 millions years old (what's 3 million years between friends, eh ?).

Ladies and gentleman...It's now a perfect time for  A Brief Joke Break ! 
A tour guide tells his tour that a geological structure is 3 million and 24 years old. One of the tour member asks how he could be so precise about the dating of the structure. He replies that he was told that the geological structure was 3 million years old when he saw it the 1st time, and he has been working there for 24 year.
Plenty of applause please. Don't stop. Feel free to yell "bravo!" and things of that nature.

Ok, back to the more serious business of holiday.

During the Ordovician Period = beginning 488.3 million years ago and ending 443.7 million years ago, most of the area above tropics was in the ocean, including here. After millions of years in the sculptor hands of erosion, corrosion and weathering to form these wondrous carbonate karst formations.

Sign, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


While there're similar karst structures around China, this is the only red karst because of its iron-rich content (i'm thinking about the grey stone forest in Kunming). If you see red colour in rock or sands, chances are, they're rich in iron (not because they're angry or shy). Iron rust is red in colour. Same principle applies here.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
(Click to enlarge)

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


The Australian center is noted for its red desert sand and rock (Uluru), and not surprisingly Australia is the largest exporter of iron ore. This is well known, but what's lesser know is that China is in fact the largest producer of iron ore. Because China is also the largest consumer of iron ore (with all that buildings of buildings and infrastructures in the last 3+ decades), they simply couldn't dig up iron ore fast enough to keep up demand. Hence China exports little and imports a lot of iron ore. Since Australian population is only 1.7% that of China, so there's easily a few hundred times less demand for iron ore in Australia compare to that of China. So Australia has plenty of iron ore to spare to sell it to China.


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
If i'm not mistaken, this used to be a lake. The water level may depend on rainy season.
But looking at how overgrown the plants are, the water has been dried up for quite awhile.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
A rod or "handle" formed at the rock face
Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
A cul-de-sac
Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
An unusual erosion of the rock that form a rod or column.
The water flows into (instead of over) the rock surface to form a deep, nearly vertical groove, leaving a column in front.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
Human gives you an idea of scale

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Some low level canyons or ravines.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Some stairs are built into the up-sloping gaps of ravine to facilitate walking.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China


Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China
The obligatory pose of Thousand-Armed Guanyin (千手观音), whom are usually depicted by 12  ± 16 arms.
The hearing-impaired dancers who perform the Thousand-Armed Bodhisattva is very popular in China.
While these tourists may attempt to emulate the Guanyin, they look more like centipede that falls on its back.



These structures were buried in soil before they were accidentally discovered a few decades sago. These carbonate karst were unearthed literally to reveal their existence. These karsts next to the the carpark are still partially buried, waiting to be unearthed (or not) to see the light of day.

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China

Karst, Red Stone Forest National Geological Park, Hunan, China





No comments:

Post a Comment